Leiden University
Lorentz Chair

Lorentz Chair since 1955

2018

Tom Lubensky

2017

Renata Kallosh [lectures]

2016

Charles L. Kane [lectures]

2015

John B. Pendry [lectures]

2014

David Gross

2013

H. Eugene Stanley

2012

Subir Sachdev [lectures]

2011

Roger Penrose

2010

Thomas A. Witten [lectures]

2009

Kip S. Thorne [lectures]

2008

F. Duncan M. Haldane [lectures]

2007

Thomas W.B. Kibble

2006

David R. Nelson

2005

Peter Zoller [lectures]

2004

Leonard Susskind

2003

Leo P. Kadanoff

2002

John P. Preskill

2001

Howard C. Berg

2000

Chandra M. Varma

1999

Michael V. Berry

1998

Frank Wilczek

1997

Bertrand I. Halperin

1996

Yoseph Imry

1995

N. David Mermin

1994

Julius Wess

1993

Michael E. Fisher

1992

Alexander F. Andreev

1991

Pierre C. Hohenberg

1990

Bernie J. Alder

1989

Martinus J.G. Veltman

1988

Claude Cohen-Tannoudji

1987

Raymond L. Orbach

1986

Philippe Nozières

1985

Ben Widom

1984

Chen Ning Yang

1983

Irwin Oppenheim

1982

Léon van Hove

1981

Ryogo Kubo

1980

Anatole Abragam

1979

Ezechiel G.D. Cohen

1978

Pierre-Gilles de Gennes

1977

Victor F. Weisskopf

1976

Rudolf E. Peierls

1975

John Bardeen

1974

Roy J. Glauber

1973

Nicolaas Bloembergen

1972

Felix Bloch

1971

David Pines

1970

Lars Onsager

1969

Isaak M. Khalatnikov

1968

Elliott W. Montroll

1967

Christian Møller

1966

Herbert Fröhlich

1965

Wladyslaw Opechowski

1964

Oskar Klein

1963

Mark Kac

1962

Léon Rosenfeld

1961

Elliott W. Montroll

1960

John H. van Vleck

1959

John G. Kirkwood

1958

Walter H. Heitler

1957

Eugene P. Wigner

1956

John A. Wheeler [reminiscence]

1955

George E. Uhlenbeck

» portrait gallery « of Nobel laureate Lorentz professors

Each year an eminent theoretical physicist holds the Lorentz Chair. The 2018 Lorentz professor is Tom Lubensky, from the University of Pennsylvania. His stay in Leiden overlaps with the Lorentz Center workshop on Topology in Complex Fluids (22-25 May, 2018).

Professor Lubensky will give three lectures on "Elasticity",
Tuesday May 8, 15, 29 (14:00-16:00 hours).
Location: De Sitterzaal, Oortgebouw.

In addition, he presents a Colloquium Ehrenfestii on Wednesday evening May 16.

Lectures on Elasticity

Elasticity is often viewed as a "classical" subject that was largely closed as an area of research by the end of the 19th century. It is rarely taught in the undergraduate physics curriculum. It, however, remains essential for the vast materials industry, and developments of new materials, measurement techniques, and theory have brought it back as a dynamic research topic. These lectures will first review the fundamental concepts of elasticity theory, with a greater emphasis on nonlinearities than can be found in most physics text books, and the bulk and surface excitation spectrum it predicts. It will then discuss the elasticity of at least a subset of the specific materials: nematic elastomers, graphene, and smectic-A liquid crystals, and filamentous networks. Finally, it will consider the exotic elasticity of topological or near-topological mechanical networks.

lecture notes

Lecture I: Fundamentals
A.	Two views of elasticity: Lagrangian and phase of mass-density waves of crystals
B.	Non-linear stress and Strain
C.	Linearized Bulk phonon spectrum
D.	Surface Rayleigh waves

Lecture II: Sample materials
A.	Nematic Elastomers: Ward identities and spontaneous broken symmetry
B.	Smectic-A liquid crystal and graphene: fluctuation breakdown of elastic response
C.	Filamentous networks

Lecture III: Elasticity of Topological Mechanical Networks
A.	Introduction to topological mechanics
B.	Guest-Hutchinson modes and their consequences.
C.	Surface excitations
D.	Real materials and the breaking of topological constraints


Signatures of the Lorentz professors on the wall of our old colloquium room.
 

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